Myopia Control in Columbia & Eldon

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Specialized Care for Myopia

Almost 30% of Americans have some degree of myopia (nearsightedness). Roughly 75% of children with myopia receive a diagnosis for the condition before the age of 12. For that reason—and many others—children should have regular, comprehensive eye exams.

If left untreated, myopia in children can continue to progress until around age 20, when vision stabilizes. But, with early intervention, we can slow the progression of myopia in children. In adults, we can manage the condition with glasses or contact lenses—or even a referral for laser eye surgery.

Family Focus Eyecare offers several methods for myopia control. Book an appointment today to learn more.

What Is Myopia?

Simply put, myopia is nearsightedness. When the eye grows too long or the cornea becomes too steep, objects in the distance will appear blurry. This is because the irregular shape of the eye causes light to focus in front of the retina rather than directly on it. 

There’s no consensus about what causes myopia, but it does appear that genetics play a role. If you have myopia, there’s a chance your child might too. 

More Than Just a Pair of Glasses

So your child needs glasses, what’s the big deal? Well, identifying and controlling myopia in children is about more than just correcting a refractive error. It’s about setting your child up for success in school, athletics, and life. 

Vision problems can impact your child academically. Children who can’t see well at school are sometimes misdiagnosed with learning or behavioral problems like ADHD. Controlling myopia can help your child avoid learning difficulties. 

Additionally, when younger children (those between 6 and 8) develop myopia, they’re more likely to develop high myopia. Those with high myopia are at a higher risk of glaucoma and continual growth and elongation of the eye can lead to retinal stretching—increasing risk of retinal detachment and other vision problems down the road.

Methods of Myopia Control

There’s no cure for myopia, but its progression can be slowed if the condition is identified in children. At Family Focus Eyecare, our staff can advise you on myopia control methods and what may be best for your child.

EyeZen Lenses

Children who spend plenty of time on digital devices or in front of screens may be at risk of developing myopia. EyeZen lenses protect against digital eye strain and help block the blue light emitted from digital screens.

Many children can learn to wear contact lenses and tolerate them well. While single-vision lenses can correct a refractive error like nearsightedness, they don’t do much to treat the underlying problem. 

Multifocal lenses contain more than one prescription in each lens. They can help slow eye growth and, in doing so, control myopia.

Corneal refractive therapy (CRT) is also known as orthokeratology (ortho-k). This method of myopia control uses specially-fitted contact lenses. When worn overnight, these lenses reshape the malleable cornea

After removing these lenses in the morning, the cornea temporarily retains its new shape. The results from CRT can be maintained as long as treatment is followed. 

Not only does ortho-k help to slow myopia, it corrects refractive errors at the same time.

It’s About Quality of Life

Catching a ball, flying a kite, and late-night stargazing are some of the joys of childhood. The ability to enjoy these activities, and many others, may be hindered by myopia. Please book an appointment for your child to diagnose or control their myopia today.

Visit One of Our Locations

Columbia

We are in Westbury-1.5 miles further west from our old W. Broadway location, near Toasty Goat and the new Club Carwash

  • 725 S. Scott Blvd Suite 101
  • Columbia, MO 65203

Eldon

Our Eldon location is on Oak Street, two blocks north of the post office and between North and High Street.

  • 115 N Oak St
  • Eldon, MO 65026

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